Citizenship Education and the Curriculum (International Perspectives on Curriculum Studies)


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Go Pages Front matter unlocked item Dedication. Connecting Values and Religion with Civics and Citizenship. Back matter Index. Retrieved from Bloomsbury Collections, www. Civics and Citizenship Education in Australia Challenges, Practices and International Perspectives Bloomsbury Academic Preview Only The full text of this chapter is only available to members of institutions that have purchased access.

Kennedy, K. London: Bloomsbury Academic. Accessed November 21, Email x Civics and Citizenship Education in Australia. There is evidence that global citizenship education aimed at educating for values to face the potential harms of globalization is converging around the world on such aims as instilling empathy and compassion, respect and appreciation of diversity, and personal habits or virtues of open-mindedness, curiosity, and creativity.

However, what these values, virtues, and dispositions look like, how they are demonstrated, and their appropriate expressions remain divergent as regards Western versus Eastern and African societies for example. Additionally, how these skills, competencies, and dispositions intersect with the cognitive skills and political views of education across societies with different cultures of teaching and learning also remains contentious.

In line with the controversies over normative views of globalization, whether the curriculum should echo globalist or skeptical positions remains contested by educators and researchers in the field. Some argue that a focus on feelings can be overrated or even harmful in such education, given the immediacy and evidence of global social justice issues that can be approached rationally and constructively. On the other hand, the appropriate focus on the local versus the global, and on the goods versus the harms of globalization, weighs differently across and within societies, from one individual educator to the next.

Thus, a lack of evidence of best practices in relation to the contestation over ultimate goals creates ambivalence at the local level among many educators about what and how to teach global citizenship or 21st-century skills, apart from standardized knowledge in math, science, and language. Education for sustainable development: Education for sustainable development is a second strand of curriculum and pedagogy that speaks back to globalization and that is broadly promoted by UNESCO and related intergovernmental and nongovernmental organizations.

Civics & Citizenship Education

Like global citizenship, education for sustainable development also emphasizes global interconnection in relation to development and sustainability challenges. It is also a broad umbrella term that reflects an increasingly wide array of practices, policies, and programs, formal and informal, for instilling virtues and knowledge and skills seen to enable effective responses to challenges brought about by globalization. Education for All is an interrelated complementary thread of UNESCO work, which sees access to education as a key to social justice and development, and the improvement of human quality of life broadly.

In developed societies, environmental sustainability has come to be seen as a pressing global issue worth curricular focus, as behaviors with regard to consumption of natural resources impact others around the world, as well as future generations. A diversity of practices and views also marks this area of education, resulting in general ambiguity about overall aims and best means. Controversies over which attitudes of sustainability are most important to inculcate, and whether it is important to inculcate them, intertwine with debates over what crises are most pertinent and what skills and competencies students should develop.

Measures are in place for standardizing sustainability knowledge in higher education worldwide, as well as for comparing the development of prosustainability attitudes. In this rich and diverse field, as processes of convergence and hybridity of glocalization continue to occur, the promise of globalization and the significance of education in relation to it will no doubt remain lively areas of debate in the future, as globalization continues to impact communities in diverse ways.

There is no shortage of normative and explanatory theories about globalization, each of which points to particular instances and evidence about domains and contexts of globalization. However, when it comes to understanding the interconnections of globalization and education, some consensus regarding best practices for research has emerged. In fields of comparative and international education and global studies in education, scholars are increasingly calling today for theories and empirical investigations that are oriented toward specificity, particularity, and locality, in contrast with the grand theories of globalization elaborated by political scholars.

Qualitative and quantitative analyses can be undertaken to measure global educational achievements, values, policy statements, and more; yet researcher reflexivity and positionality, what is traditionally conceived of as research ethics, is increasingly seen as vital for researchers in this politically and ethically contentious field. In either case, cultural assumptions can interfere or interact in problematic or unintentional ways with methodologies of data gathering and analysis, for instance, when questions or codes related to race, ethnicity, or class, for example are applied across diverse sites by researchers, who may not be very familiar and experienced across divergent cultural contexts.

Among recent strands of educational research fueled by appreciation for globalization is the exploration of the global economy of knowledge. Such research may consider the practices and patterns of movement, collaboration, research production and publication, and authorship of researchers, and examine data from cultural, political, and economic perspectives, asking whose knowledge is regarded as valid and most prized, and what voices dominate in conversations and discourse around globalization and education, such as in classrooms studying global studies in education, or in leading research journals.

As globalization of education entails the globalization of knowledge itself, such inquiries can be directed to various sites and disciplines outside of education, in considering how communication, values, and knowledge are being dynamically revised today on a global scale through processes of globalization. Research that focuses on globalization and education uses a wide array of approaches and methods, topics, and orientations, as well as diverse theoretical perspectives and normative assumptions.

The foregoing sections have explored this general field, major debates, and topics; the relationships have been traced between globalization and education; and there have been brief comments on considerations for research. One key point of the analysis has been that the way globalization is conceived has implications for how its relationship with education is understood. This is important, for as is illustrated here, the ways of conceptualizing globalization are diverse, in terms of how the era of globalization is framed chronologically as essential to the human condition, to modernity, or as a late 20th-century phenomena , what its chief characteristics are from cultural, political-economic, and technological views, and whether its impact on human life and history is seen as good or bad.


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A broad consideration of viewpoints has highlighted the emergence of a middle position within research literature: there is most certainly an intertwined meeting and movement of peoples, things, and ideas around the globe; and clearly, processes associated with globalization have good and bad aspects. However, these processes are uneven, and they can be seen to impact different communities in various ways, which are clearly not, on the whole, simply all good or all bad. That the processes associated with globalization are interrelated with the history and future of education is undeniable.

In many ways global convergence around educational policies, practices, and values can be observed in the early 21st century. Yet educational borrowing and transferral remain unstraightforward in practice, as educational and cultural differences across social contexts remain, while the ultimate ends of education such as math competencies versus moral cultivation are essentially contested. Thus, specificity is important to understand globalization in relation to education.

Curriculum Studies MA | College of Education | DePaul University, Chicago

As cultural and political-economic considerations remain crucial in understanding major aspects of both globalization and education, positionality and research ethics and reflexivity remain important research concerns, to understand globalization not just as homogeneity or oppressive top-down features, but as complex and dynamic local, global, and transnational intersections of people, ideas, and goods, with unclear impacts in the future.

Besley, T. Interculturalism: Education and dialogue. New York: Peter Lang. Find this resource:. Bray, M. Comparative education research: Approaches and methods. Held, D. The global transformation reader: An introduction to the globalization debate. Cambridge, U. Ritzer, G. The Blackwell companion to globalization. Malden, MA: Blackwell. Rizvi, F. Globalizing educational policy. London: Routledge. Robinson, W. Transnational conflicts: Central America, social change, and globalization.

London: Verso. Sklair, L. Globalization: Capitalism and its alternatives. New York: Oxford University Press. Stiglitz, J. Making globalization work. New York: W. Walby, S.

How do we create transformative global citizens?

Globalization and inequalities. London: SAGE. Wallerstein, I. The modern world system. New York: Academic. Robinson , Theories of globalization, in G. Ritzer Ed. Robertson, Globalization. For an historical example of how negative cultural comparison has interconnected with international political relations, see H. Kotef , Little Chinese feet encased in iron shoes: Freedom, movement, gender, and empire in Western political thought, Political Theory, 43 , — Anderson , Imagined communities London: Verso.

Anderson, Imagined communities. Nussbaum , For love of country? Boston: Boston Press. Wallerstein , Globalization or the age of transition? International Sociology, 15 , — Wallerstein, Globalization. Robinson, Theories. Rizvi and B. Lingard , Globalizing educational policy London: Routledge.

Elizabeth Tudball

Robinson , Transnational conflicts: Central America, social change, and globalization London: Verso. Castells , The rise of the network society Oxford: Blackwell.

Giddens , The consequences of modernity Cambridge, U. Harvey , The condition of post-modernity London: Blackwell. See also D.

Citizenship Education and the Curriculum (International Perspectives on Curriculum Studies) Citizenship Education and the Curriculum (International Perspectives on Curriculum Studies)
Citizenship Education and the Curriculum (International Perspectives on Curriculum Studies) Citizenship Education and the Curriculum (International Perspectives on Curriculum Studies)
Citizenship Education and the Curriculum (International Perspectives on Curriculum Studies) Citizenship Education and the Curriculum (International Perspectives on Curriculum Studies)
Citizenship Education and the Curriculum (International Perspectives on Curriculum Studies) Citizenship Education and the Curriculum (International Perspectives on Curriculum Studies)
Citizenship Education and the Curriculum (International Perspectives on Curriculum Studies) Citizenship Education and the Curriculum (International Perspectives on Curriculum Studies)

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